Guisborough St Nicholas

Name: St Nicholas'

Date of Temple Moore Work: 1903&ndash08

Work done: restoration and additions

Church Description

A Perpendicular church built at the end of the 15th century and restored to glory by Temple Moore.

Like so many churches in Yorkshire, St Nicholas' was rebuilt in the 18th century. Moore was drafted in to restore the medieval chancel, only part of which had survived intact, so that today's chancel is part-original, part-restoration. His work cost the then rather lavish sum of £6,389.

Opening times: Please see www.achurchnearyou.com/guisborough-st-nicholas for information. There is disabled parking available.

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Moore was also responsible for new tracery, roofs and buttresses, the parapets on the aisles, and the stair turret at the north end. He moved an old window from the east of the chancel to the south of the tower, and had a matching new one made for the north.

The Perpendicular was a style of architecture which represented the third stage of English gothic. It became prevalent during the 15th and 16th centuries. It was characterised by vertical tracery in large windows. The more hardline members of the ecclesiological movement regarded the Perpendicular with distrust. For them the “true” gothic belonged to the second stage, the “Middle Pointed” or “Decorated” style which was prevalent from the late 13th to the mid 14th century.

Nearby Hutton Hall is a reminder that the Gothic Revival wasn't restricted to church-building. This fantastical creation, all pointy turrets and mullioned windows, was designed by Alfred Waterhouse for Sir Joseph Whitwell Pease in 1866–67. Pease came from a prominent family of Quaker merchants and industrialists. He was a Liberal MP from 1865 to 1903. Such was Pease's influence that at one time Hutton Hall had its own railway station on the Middlesbrough–Guisborough branch line!

Things to do nearby

Guisborough Forest and Walkway

Pinchinthorpe TS14 8HD

01287 631132

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/guisborough

Guisborough Forest was planted in the 1950s on top of disused mine workings. It's mainly coniferous — pines and larches — but there are largish pockets of oak, beech and sycamore. In amongst the trees there's a visitor centre and lots of active stuff to enjoy: cycle trails, walking routes, bridleways, orienteering, a play area, sculpture trail and picnic sites galore.

Tocketts Mill

Guisborough TS14 6QA

01287 634437

http://www.tockettsmill.co.uk/

Fully restored water-driven cornmill and Grade II listed building. One of the most complete mills in the country, it has four floors of original machinery and a large collection of milling equipment. The machinery still runs and you can buy flour milled here. Restaurant on site.

Guisborough Forest and Walkway

Pinchinthorpe TS14 8HD

01287 631132

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/guisborough

Guisborough Forest was planted in the 1950s on top of disused mine workings. It's mainly coniferous — pines and larches — but there are largish pockets of oak, beech and sycamore. In amongst the trees there's a visitor centre and lots of active stuff to enjoy: cycle trails, walking routes, bridleways, orienteering, a play area, sculpture trail and picnic sites galore.

Captain Cook Monument

Easby Moor

Obelisk plonked on the moor in honour of local schoolboy turned globe-bestriding mariner. Great views from the top and an invigorating walk to get there. Best approached from the Forestry Commission parking area at Gribdale Gate. From Great Ayton head east along Station Road and Dikes Lane for about two and a half miles.

Captain Cook Schoolroom Museum

Great Ayton TS9 6NB

01642 724296

http://www.captaincookschoolroommuseum.co.uk/

Captain James Cook FRS, RN is everywhere in the North York Moors, but we can't begrudge Great Ayton a share of his legacy, since it was here that the young Cook had many of his formative experiences. The museum is housed in a former charity school founded in 1704 by a local landowner. Cook attended the school from 1736 to 1740. The schoolroom has been reconstructed to give a flavour of those times, and there are interactive displays about Cook's early life and education and his later achievements.

Baysdale

Near Kildale

Secretive dale, virtually landlocked by swelling seas of purple heather. Perfect for walkers who don't particularly want to see other walkers.

Roseberry Topping

Newton-under-Roseberry

01723 870423

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/roseberry-topping

Many a budding mountaineer has cut his or her teeth climbing Roseberry Topping, known affectionately as the “Yorkshire Matterhorn” on account of its distinctive profile. This pint-size mini mountain (all 1,049 feet/320 m of it) can be seen from miles around, and the graffiti on the summit is a slightly depressing testament to its popularity. But don't let that put you off: the view is stupendous, the climb is fairly easygoing, the bluebell woods at the foot are gorgeous, and the countryside around about is sublime. National Park car park in Newton-under-Roseberry.

Stokesley

Handsome old Georgian coaching town, which escaped the industrialisation that transformed its Teesside neighbours. Plenty of little shops to wander round.

Transporter Bridge

Ferry Road Middlesbrough TS2 1PL

01642 728162

Middlesbrough has suffered more than its fair share of post-industrial decline, and it isn't the obvious place to go sightseeing. Yet it has a certain ruined grandeur that some may find appealing. It was, after all, once one of Britain's industrial powerhouses, and its iron foundries were world-class. The Sydney Harbour Bridge was built here, as was the Tyne Bridge. Middlesbrough's own bridge is only slightly less iconic. The Transporter is a triumph of modernity. Drivers and pedestrians enter a gondola suspended beneath the main span of the bridge and are carried over the Tees from Middlesbrough to Port Clarence over the river, 160 feet in the air. The bridge turned 100 in 2011, but don't assume it's a relic: it's still in daily use.

mima

Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art Centre Square Middlesbroug TS1 2AZ

01642 726720

http://www.visitmima.com/

New York has MoMA, Middlesbrough has MIMA. A stunning contemporary building forming one side of a new public space, MIMA will surprise you if you haven't been to Middlesbrough for a few years. Like the Hepworth, BALTIC, Arnolfini and others it is a partner of Plus Tate. Programming at MIMA is coming into its own with interesting world class exhibitions, art from the collections, and lots of hands-on events and workshops.

Captain Cook Birthplace Museum

Stewart Park Marton Middlesbrough TS7 8AT

01642 311211

http://www.captcook-ne.co.uk/

One of three museums in the North York Moors that stake a claim to Cook's legacy, but with slightly more justification, since the great explorer was born here, as you may have guessed from the name. Themed displays, temporary exhibitions, associated events and a lively education programme give you a flavour of Cook's world. If you're hooked on Cook, the other two museums are at Staithes, where he was apprenticed, and Great Ayton, where he went to school. Both are easy to reach from Middlesbrough.

Where to eat and drink

Cafe Rosso

Chaloner Street Guisborough TS14 6QD

01287 284396

http://www.cafferosso.uk.com/

Italian restaurant. Its website is utterly impenetrable, thanks to one of those fonts that look like a child's handwriting, which is a shame, because the food's nice and very reasonably priced. Good for lunch.

The Cat's Whiskers Bistro

Chaloner Street Guisborough TS14 6QD

01287 204196

http://thecatswhiskersbistro.co.uk/

Coffee and sandwich bar in the daytime and bistro by evening. The menu's a treat.

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