Carlton In Cleveland

Name: St. Botolph's

Date of Temple Moore Work: 1896-97

Work done: Design and building of church

Church Description

St Botolph's has been described by Geoff Brandwood, today's leading authority on Temple Moore, as one of the architect's loveliest buildings.

Typical Moore features include the graceful handling of the scale of the nave and chancel, the asymmetrical placing of the windows, and the way the tower, aisles and south doorway all interrelate.

Opening times: Please see www.achurchnearyou.com/carlton-st-botolph. There is a steeply sloping path up from the road and four steps up into the lychgate with further steps beyond.

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St Botolph's was built at the instigation of the vicar, the Reverend John Latimer Kyle, with whom Moore became good friends. Lord Feversham donated the stone for the church, in return for which Kyle conducted services at another of Moore's churches, St John the Evangelist's in Bilsdale.

The Reverend Kyle was one of those dizzyingly energetic public men who seem to turn up everywhere in late-Victorian England. Besides combining his ministry with farming and owning the pub next to the vicarage, he was a well-known sportsman and Master of Hounds for the local hunt. He eventually became a canon at York Minster.

The church features Moore's signature elongated piers. Like all of his work, it is evidence of a mind concerned not just with how the building looks but with how it feels. The calm and welcoming atmosphere at St Botolph's is a product of Moore's skilful manipulation of space and proportion. He also enjoyed introducing elements like the piercings at the back of the sedilia (the canopied stone seat near the altar) and the piscina (the shallow basin used for washing the communion vessels) without the effect being at all jarring.

The clerk-of-the-works during the building of St Botolph's is said to have been Giles Gilbert Scott, later famous for designing the red telephone box. He was apprenticed to Moore in 1899.

There's a sad story about the prehistory of St Botolph's. The previous vicar, George Sanger, had devoted years to raising funds in order to build a church here, even doing the stone and wood carving himself. Then, in 1882, the night before the dedication, the building was burnt to the ground. The poor vicar was arrested on suspicion of arson. The fire was in all likelihood the result of a revenge attack — Sanger has just dismissed the local schoolmaster for being “manifestly unfit”. Nevertheless, the incident ended Sanger's career. You can read the full story in John Fairfax Blakeborough's “Life in a Yorkshire Village.”

Another notable resident of the village was ironmaster and engineer John Gjer, two of whose patented kilns formed part of the auction sale of the Grosmont ironworks in 1891. The list of items in the sale is mindboggling: 67 cottages, 3 villa residences, a workmen's institute, offices, and a butcher's shop were included, not to mention the freehold of 104 acres with mineral rights. The starting price was £10,000.

Things to do nearby

Captain Cook Monument

Easby Moor

Obelisk plonked on the moor in honour of local schoolboy turned globe-bestriding mariner. Great views from the top and an invigorating walk to get there. Best approached from the Forestry Commission parking area at Gribdale Gate. From Great Ayton head east along Station Road and Dikes Lane for about two and a half miles.

The Wainstones

Hasty Bank, near Chop Gate

Hilltop outcrop of sandstone boulders with fabulous views over the Cleveland Plain. Free parking at Clay Bank, about a mile away.

Baysdale

Near Kildale

Secretive dale, virtually landlocked by swelling seas of purple heather. Perfect for walkers who don't particularly want to see other walkers.

Spout House

4 miles south of Chop Gate on the B1257

A beautifully preserved example of a traditional local building. Spout House is the finest surviving cruck-built house in the north of England. Crucks are pairs of curved timbers raised upright to create A-shaped frames. The infill walls were built of local stone and the roof was thatched with heather. Nearly all the houses in the North York Moors were built in this way until the advent of more cosmopolitan building styles in the 18th century spelt the end of the vernacular tradition. Nearly all of the cruck-built houses of the North York Moors were pulled down or renovated beyond recognition. By happy accident Spout House escaped alteration. Built in 1550, it was originally a farmworker's cottage. In 1714 it became an alehouse known as the Sun Inn. It traded as an inn for two hundred years until a bigger premises was built across the yard. Time was called at Spout House in 1914 and the building was closed up and used as a store. The building was restored in 1982 and is now open to the public. Open Easter to 31 October daily 10am to 4pm except Thursdays.

Stokesley

Handsome old Georgian coaching town, which escaped the industrialisation that transformed its Teesside neighbours. Plenty of little shops to wander round.

Roseberry Topping

Newton-under-Roseberry

01723 870423

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/roseberry-topping

Many a budding mountaineer has cut his or her teeth climbing Roseberry Topping, known affectionately as the “Yorkshire Matterhorn” on account of its distinctive profile. This pint-size mini mountain (all 1,049 feet/320 m of it) can be seen from miles around, and the graffiti on the summit is a slightly depressing testament to its popularity. But don't let that put you off: the view is stupendous, the climb is fairly easygoing, the bluebell woods at the foot are gorgeous, and the countryside around about is sublime. National Park car park in Newton-under-Roseberry.

Whorlton Castle

Near Swainby

Ruined medieval castle. Situated next to the abandoned village of Whorlton, of which hardly a trace remains. The castle was built in the early 12th century. It's had a chequered recent history: languishing in private hands, it has never had the heritage makeover that other local castles have had, and it has gradually fallen prey to vandalism and the elements. The plus side is it offers a rare chance to see a medieval castle without a ticket booth in sight. It's not supposed to be open to the public — a padlock occasionally appears on the gate, before disappearing again &mdash but there's usually someone to be found wandering around. Alternatively, admire it, and the view, from the roadside

Captain Cook Schoolroom Museum

Great Ayton TS9 6NB

01642 724296

http://www.captaincookschoolroommuseum.co.uk/

Captain James Cook FRS, RN is everywhere in the North York Moors, but we can't begrudge Great Ayton a share of his legacy, since it was here that the young Cook had many of his formative experiences. The museum is housed in a former charity school founded in 1704 by a local landowner. Cook attended the school from 1736 to 1740. The schoolroom has been reconstructed to give a flavour of those times, and there are interactive displays about Cook's early life and education and his later achievements.

The Wainstones Hotel

Great Broughton TS9 7EW

01642 712268

http://www.wainstoneshotel.co.uk/

Country pub wrapped up in an elegant hotel. Reasonably priced food, comfortable bar.

Where to eat and drink

The Wainstones

Hasty Bank, near Chop Gate

Hilltop outcrop of sandstone boulders with fabulous views over the Cleveland Plain. Free parking at Clay Bank, about a mile away.

Spout House

4 miles south of Chop Gate on the B1257

A beautifully preserved example of a traditional local building. Spout House is the finest surviving cruck-built house in the north of England. Crucks are pairs of curved timbers raised upright to create A-shaped frames. The infill walls were built of local stone and the roof was thatched with heather. Nearly all the houses in the North York Moors were built in this way until the advent of more cosmopolitan building styles in the 18th century spelt the end of the vernacular tradition. Nearly all of the cruck-built houses of the North York Moors were pulled down or renovated beyond recognition. By happy accident Spout House escaped alteration. Built in 1550, it was originally a farmworker's cottage. In 1714 it became an alehouse known as the Sun Inn. It traded as an inn for two hundred years until a bigger premises was built across the yard. Time was called at Spout House in 1914 and the building was closed up and used as a store. The building was restored in 1982 and is now open to the public. Open Easter to 31 October daily 10am to 4pm except Thursdays.

The Blackwell Ox

Carlton in Cleveland TS9 7DJ

01642 712287

http://www.theblackwellox.co.uk/

One of those increasingly common hybrids: a traditional country pub specialising in exotic cuisine, in this case Thai. Thai chefs are in residence, so all the food is freshly prepared. English fare also on offer, along with a large selection of real ales.

The Buck Inn

Chop Gate TS9 7JL

01642 778334

http://www.the-buck-inn.co.uk/

Welcoming country pub. Real ales, bar snacks, separate dining room.

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