Nunthorpe St Marys

Name: St Mary's

Date of Temple Moore Work: 1914 (design); 1920 (building)

Work done: Design and building of the church

Church Description

The long lull between the designing and the building of this handsome small church bears witness to a family tragedy.

Temple Moore designed St Mary's in 1914, with the help of his son and apprentice Richard, whom he hoped would take over his practice upon his retirement. But in the same year the First World War broke out. Richard was called up in 1916. On his way home to England on leave in 1918 he was killed in the torpedoing of the SS Leinster. He was 25.

The church is open at service times. Please see www.stmarys-nunthorpe.org for information. St.Marys is fully accessible to all.

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St Mary's was not built until two years later, in 1920. After Temple Moore's own death on 30th June that year, his son-in-law Leslie Moore took over his practice and completed his work at Nunthorpe.

Although Temple Moore didn't live to see it completed, St Mary's is imbued with the sure touch of his later work. Particularly characteristic of this period is the positioning of the chancel at a higher level than the nave. The chancel also has a clerestory, which the nave lacks.

If you compare the population of Nunthorpe in the 19th century with that of neighbouring Middlesbrough, you get a stark impression of how the industrial revolution affected this area. They were both small villages in 1831, Nunthorpe with 125 people and Middlesbrough with 154 people. Seventy years later in 1900 the change was astonishing. Nunthorpe now had a population of 198, but Middlesbrough, swollen by the growing coal, iron and steel industries, had grown to 91,302.

Nunthorpe has the distinction of having its own nuclear fallout shelter, near Tree Brigg farm. It dates from 1963, when the government of the day set out to build 870 shelters with 17 regional administration centres.

Another notable Gothic Revival building in Nunthorpe is Grey Towers House. It was designed by John Ross of Darlington for the ironmaster William Randolph Hopkins between 1865 and 1867. From 1895 to 1931 it was the home of the industrialist Sir Arthur Dorman. Dorman was a partner in Dorman Long, the company that designed and built the Sydney Harbour and Tyne bridges. The iron came from the ironstone mines of the North York Moors.

Things to do nearby

Transporter Bridge

Ferry Road Middlesbrough TS2 1PL

01642 728162

Middlesbrough has suffered more than its fair share of post-industrial decline, and it isn't the obvious place to go sightseeing. Yet it has a certain ruined grandeur that some may find appealing. It was, after all, once one of Britain's industrial powerhouses, and its iron foundries were world-class. The Sydney Harbour Bridge was built here, as was the Tyne Bridge. Middlesbrough's own bridge is only slightly less iconic. The Transporter is a triumph of modernity. Drivers and pedestrians enter a gondola suspended beneath the main span of the bridge and are carried over the Tees from Middlesbrough to Port Clarence over the river, 160 feet in the air. The bridge turned 100 in 2011, but don't assume it's a relic: it's still in daily use.

mima

Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art Centre Square Middlesbroug TS1 2AZ

01642 726720

http://www.visitmima.com/

New York has MoMA, Middlesbrough has MIMA. A stunning contemporary building forming one side of a new public space, MIMA will surprise you if you haven't been to Middlesbrough for a few years. Like the Hepworth, BALTIC, Arnolfini and others it is a partner of Plus Tate. Programming at MIMA is coming into its own with interesting world class exhibitions, art from the collections, and lots of hands-on events and workshops.

Captain Cook Birthplace Museum

Stewart Park Marton Middlesbrough TS7 8AT

01642 311211

http://www.captcook-ne.co.uk/

One of three museums in the North York Moors that stake a claim to Cook's legacy, but with slightly more justification, since the great explorer was born here, as you may have guessed from the name. Themed displays, temporary exhibitions, associated events and a lively education programme give you a flavour of Cook's world. If you're hooked on Cook, the other two museums are at Staithes, where he was apprenticed, and Great Ayton, where he went to school. Both are easy to reach from Middlesbrough.

Roseberry Topping

Newton-under-Roseberry

01723 870423

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/roseberry-topping

Many a budding mountaineer has cut his or her teeth climbing Roseberry Topping, known affectionately as the “Yorkshire Matterhorn” on account of its distinctive profile. This pint-size mini mountain (all 1,049 feet/320 m of it) can be seen from miles around, and the graffiti on the summit is a slightly depressing testament to its popularity. But don't let that put you off: the view is stupendous, the climb is fairly easygoing, the bluebell woods at the foot are gorgeous, and the countryside around about is sublime. National Park car park in Newton-under-Roseberry.

Stokesley

Handsome old Georgian coaching town, which escaped the industrialisation that transformed its Teesside neighbours. Plenty of little shops to wander round.

Captain Cook Birthplace Museum

Stewart Park Marton Middlesbrough TS7 8AT

01642 311211

http://www.captcook-ne.co.uk/

One of three museums in the North York Moors that stake a claim to Cook's legacy, but with slightly more justification, since the great explorer was born here, as you may have guessed from the name. Themed displays, temporary exhibitions, associated events and a lively education programme give you a flavour of Cook's world. If you're hooked on Cook, the other two museums are at Staithes, where he was apprenticed, and Great Ayton, where he went to school. Both are easy to reach from Middlesbrough.

Baysdale

Near Kildale

Secretive dale, virtually landlocked by swelling seas of purple heather. Perfect for walkers who don't particularly want to see other walkers.

Guisborough Forest and Walkway

Pinchinthorpe TS14 8HD

01287 631132

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/guisborough

Guisborough Forest was planted in the 1950s on top of disused mine workings. It's mainly coniferous — pines and larches — but there are largish pockets of oak, beech and sycamore. In amongst the trees there's a visitor centre and lots of active stuff to enjoy: cycle trails, walking routes, bridleways, orienteering, a play area, sculpture trail and picnic sites galore.

Captain Cook Monument

Easby Moor

Obelisk plonked on the moor in honour of local schoolboy turned globe-bestriding mariner. Great views from the top and an invigorating walk to get there. Best approached from the Forestry Commission parking area at Gribdale Gate. From Great Ayton head east along Station Road and Dikes Lane for about two and a half miles.

Gisborough Priory

Guisborough

01287 633801

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/gisborough-priory

The inexplicably-spelled Gisborough Priory is the ruin of an Augustinian priory founded by the Bruce family, afterwards Kings of Scotland. The site is dominated by the gaunt skeleton of the east end of the 14th-century church. The grounds are a little haven of calm amidst the bustle of the market town outside.

Where to eat and drink

Chadwicks Inn

Maltby Middlesbrough TS8 0BG

01642 590300

http://www.chadwicksinnmaltby.co.uk/

Teesside isn't exactly overwhelmed with great places to eat, but this one pulls in the plaudits, having all manner of AA and Michelin gongs to its name. Have a look at the menu and you'll see why: it's adventurous, inventive, and genuinely good value for money.

Whinstone View

Great Ayton Middlesbrough TS9 6QG

01642 723285

http://www.whinstoneview.com/

We like the no-nonsense pricing policy here: the menu's all in nice round figures, and isn't afraid to call £4.99 a fiver. The food's of the same ilk: straightforward, well-cooked, well-presented and of an excellent quality.

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