Kirkby In Cleveland

Name: St Augustine's

Date of Temple Moore Work: 1905–06

Work done: restoration and rebuilding

Church Description

A fine instance of Temple Moore's undogmatic approach to his craft: a church designed for low-church sensibilities by an avowedly high-church architect.

Moore worked carefully to fulfil the aspirations of his clients, even when his own religious instincts ran counter to theirs. Hence the plain wooden cross and restrained tracery at St Augustine's. It was an approach that paid off. The money for church restoration was often raised among the congregation themselves. Moore's tactful dealing meant that he was often asked back to do more work when the money became available. He returned to St Augustine's in 1909 to provide the reredos.

Opening times: Please see www.achurchnearyou.com/kirkby-in-cleveland-st-augustine for information.

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The restoration and rebuilding of St Augustine's cost £1,860, and Moore brought in his usual builder, Brotton of Bilsdale, to do the work.

Pevsner said of Moore's work here that it had “produced a fine, high piece with much that is individual”. However, he went on to lament the loss of the complete Georgian church of 1815 which Moore had gothicised: “if only it had been left alone”.

It's a clear indication of how much architectural tastes changed in the fifty years after Moore's death. When Pevsner was writing in the 1960's, Gothic Revival buildings were being pulled down and Sir George Gilbert Scott's masterpiece, the Midland Grand Hotel at St Pancras Station, was under threat of demolition. It is only relatively recently that the Gothic Revival has been re-evaluated and Temple Moore has come to be regarded as "arguably the greatest of all Victorian church architects", in the words of the architectural historian Gavin Stamp.

The chancel and fittings at St Augustine's were featured in the Architectural Room of the Royal Society of Arts Exhibition in London in 1907. The exhibition ran from 6th May until 5th August. During that time 290,836 people visited the exhibition to see the 1,845 works on display.

Things to do nearby

Roseberry Topping

Newton-under-Roseberry

01723 870423

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/roseberry-topping

Many a budding mountaineer has cut his or her teeth climbing Roseberry Topping, known affectionately as the “Yorkshire Matterhorn” on account of its distinctive profile. This pint-size mini mountain (all 1,049 feet/320 m of it) can be seen from miles around, and the graffiti on the summit is a slightly depressing testament to its popularity. But don't let that put you off: the view is stupendous, the climb is fairly easygoing, the bluebell woods at the foot are gorgeous, and the countryside around about is sublime. National Park car park in Newton-under-Roseberry.

Captain Cook Monument

Easby Moor

Obelisk plonked on the moor in honour of local schoolboy turned globe-bestriding mariner. Great views from the top and an invigorating walk to get there. Best approached from the Forestry Commission parking area at Gribdale Gate. From Great Ayton head east along Station Road and Dikes Lane for about two and a half miles.

The Wainstones

Hasty Bank, near Chop Gate

Hilltop outcrop of sandstone boulders with fabulous views over the Cleveland Plain. Free parking at Clay Bank, about a mile away.

Baysdale

Near Kildale

Secretive dale, virtually landlocked by swelling seas of purple heather. Perfect for walkers who don't particularly want to see other walkers.

Spout House

4 miles south of Chop Gate on the B1257

A beautifully preserved example of a traditional local building. Spout House is the finest surviving cruck-built house in the north of England. Crucks are pairs of curved timbers raised upright to create A-shaped frames. The infill walls were built of local stone and the roof was thatched with heather. Nearly all the houses in the North York Moors were built in this way until the advent of more cosmopolitan building styles in the 18th century spelt the end of the vernacular tradition. Nearly all of the cruck-built houses of the North York Moors were pulled down or renovated beyond recognition. By happy accident Spout House escaped alteration. Built in 1550, it was originally a farmworker's cottage. In 1714 it became an alehouse known as the Sun Inn. It traded as an inn for two hundred years until a bigger premises was built across the yard. Time was called at Spout House in 1914 and the building was closed up and used as a store. The building was restored in 1982 and is now open to the public. Open Easter to 31 October daily 10am to 4pm except Thursdays.

Stokesley

Handsome old Georgian coaching town, which escaped the industrialisation that transformed its Teesside neighbours. Plenty of little shops to wander round.

Whorlton Castle

Near Swainby

Ruined medieval castle. Situated next to the abandoned village of Whorlton, of which hardly a trace remains. The castle was built in the early 12th century. It's had a chequered recent history: languishing in private hands, it has never had the heritage makeover that other local castles have had, and it has gradually fallen prey to vandalism and the elements. The plus side is it offers a rare chance to see a medieval castle without a ticket booth in sight. It's not supposed to be open to the public — a padlock occasionally appears on the gate, before disappearing again &mdash but there's usually someone to be found wandering around. Alternatively, admire it, and the view, from the roadside

Captain Cook Schoolroom Museum

Great Ayton TS9 6NB

01642 724296

http://www.captaincookschoolroommuseum.co.uk/

Captain James Cook FRS, RN is everywhere in the North York Moors, but we can't begrudge Great Ayton a share of his legacy, since it was here that the young Cook had many of his formative experiences. The museum is housed in a former charity school founded in 1704 by a local landowner. Cook attended the school from 1736 to 1740. The schoolroom has been reconstructed to give a flavour of those times, and there are interactive displays about Cook's early life and education and his later achievements.

The Wainstones Hotel

Great Broughton TS9 7EW

01642 712268

http://www.wainstoneshotel.co.uk/

Country pub wrapped up in an elegant hotel. Reasonably priced food, comfortable bar.

Where to eat and drink

The Wainstones

Hasty Bank, near Chop Gate

Hilltop outcrop of sandstone boulders with fabulous views over the Cleveland Plain. Free parking at Clay Bank, about a mile away.

Spout House

4 miles south of Chop Gate on the B1257

A beautifully preserved example of a traditional local building. Spout House is the finest surviving cruck-built house in the north of England. Crucks are pairs of curved timbers raised upright to create A-shaped frames. The infill walls were built of local stone and the roof was thatched with heather. Nearly all the houses in the North York Moors were built in this way until the advent of more cosmopolitan building styles in the 18th century spelt the end of the vernacular tradition. Nearly all of the cruck-built houses of the North York Moors were pulled down or renovated beyond recognition. By happy accident Spout House escaped alteration. Built in 1550, it was originally a farmworker's cottage. In 1714 it became an alehouse known as the Sun Inn. It traded as an inn for two hundred years until a bigger premises was built across the yard. Time was called at Spout House in 1914 and the building was closed up and used as a store. The building was restored in 1982 and is now open to the public. Open Easter to 31 October daily 10am to 4pm except Thursdays.

The Blackwell Ox

Carlton in Cleveland TS9 7DJ

01642 712287

http://www.theblackwellox.co.uk/

One of those increasingly common hybrids: a traditional country pub specialising in exotic cuisine, in this case Thai. Thai chefs are in residence, so all the food is freshly prepared. English fare also on offer, along with a large selection of real ales.

The Buck Inn

Chop Gate TS9 7JL

01642 778334

http://www.the-buck-inn.co.uk/

Welcoming country pub. Real ales, bar snacks, separate dining room.

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